How the Keystone XL Pipeline will reshape the energy landscape

The Obama administration has granted preliminary approval to the Keystone Pipeline, the controversial 1,900-mile project that would carry crude oil from Alberta, Canada, to refineries along the Gulf Coast.

The final decision is expected to be announced by President Donald Trump later this month.

The pipeline has drawn a sharp response from environmental groups who say the project is a threat to the health of the Gulf of Mexico and threatens to destroy the wildlife and habitat of many tribes.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is now assessing the environmental impact of the pipeline, which will connect the Bakken shale of North Dakota to Texas refineries.

The project would run through oil-rich oil fields in North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa.

The proposed route would include the northern border of Montana, where the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and their allies are protesting the construction of the Keystone project.

The tribes and other environmental groups have long been calling for the pipeline to be reversed to create an environmentally safe corridor for oil production.

But a number of other groups and some industry experts have raised concerns about the impact on the health and health of wildlife.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) on Monday said it was reviewing the environmental assessment of the project.

“The Pipeline and Hazards Assessment is required to determine whether there are any environmental risks associated with the proposed pipeline construction,” the agency said in a statement.

“Based on this review, we have determined that the safety and health impacts of the proposed Pipeline and Explosives Safety Administration Pipeline in the U.M.S.,” the statement said. “

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is reviewing the pipeline as well. “

Based on this review, we have determined that the safety and health impacts of the proposed Pipeline and Explosives Safety Administration Pipeline in the U.M.S.,” the statement said.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is reviewing the pipeline as well.

“In addition to the final environmental assessment, the agency has received and is reviewing additional data that we have received that includes data on pipeline safety, and we are considering all the information and data we have as we conduct this review,” a EPA spokesperson said in an email to The Associated Press.

The EPA has not yet released the final report, but it has said it will issue an interim report in the coming months.

EPA spokeswoman Gina Cernovich said in the statement that the agency was considering whether to consider additional data, such as the impacts on wildlife, as it considers the project’s impacts.

The Keystone XL pipeline would carry a total of 830,000 barrels of oil a day from Alberta to refiners along the U:S.

Gulf Coast, the United States’ second-biggest export market.

The 1,944-mile line would cross several tribes, including the Standing Sioux Tribe, the Dakotas, and the Navajo Nation.

The tribe and other environmentalists are concerned that the pipeline would destroy wildlife habitat and kill the Standing Sunflower, an endangered native American bird.

In April, the U of M’s Institute of Indian and Tribal Affairs (IISSA) issued a statement saying that the Standing Stone Sioux Tribe “strongly believes that the Keystone pipeline poses an unprecedented threat to its health and safety.”

“We believe the Keystone and other pipeline projects pose a risk to our health and the health status of our tribal lands,” the statement read.

“It is critical that our land be protected from the pipeline and the pipeline is not permitted.”