Paperless pipeline: Alaska Pipeline Approved, Trans Alaskan Pipeline Approval Deadline Extended

The approval of a pipeline for the North American oil and gas industry is about to expire.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) announced Tuesday that it would be issuing an extension to the approval of the Northern Gateway pipeline from the Bering Strait to the Beaufort Sea, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The PHMSA had originally scheduled the pipeline for a December expiration.

However, an emergency rule signed by President Donald Trump in March meant that the pipeline was no longer eligible for a January extension.

The approval of Northern Gateway would have given the Trans-Alaska Pipeline a $3.6 billion construction loan, and the company would have needed to meet a $2.2 billion environmental impact study.

PHMSC officials said the extension would allow the pipeline to be built by the end of 2020, although they did not provide an exact date.

Northern Gateway would be the first of a wave of projects to be approved by the Trump administration in the wake of a 2016 moratorium on the construction of oil and natural gas pipelines in Alaska.

The Trans-alaska Pipeline would have a total length of 636 miles (1,838 kilometers), and would carry about 570,000 barrels per day (bpd) of oil through Alaska’s remote and sparsely populated Northwest.

The pipeline would run under the Baffin Island chain and cross the Beauvois River, the world’s largest, before reaching the Canadian border.

The North American Energy Security Administration (NAESA), the government agency responsible for overseeing PHMSS safety and environmental reviews of new pipelines, announced the extension Tuesday.

The NEA also said it would review a separate environmental impact statement issued by the National Energy Board that would determine the pipeline’s safety and economic impact.

The statement, issued in May 2016, called for an environmental assessment for the pipeline.

The agency has since said that PHMMS had failed to meet its requirements for a new pipeline and should have been allowed to continue to build the pipeline in 2016.

In an interview with the Associated Press last week, President Donald Trumps spokesman, Mike Short, said that the president’s executive order banning the construction and operation of pipelines was a “misguided, dangerous executive order” that was a product of a political agenda.

“I don’t think the president would be able to get his way on the pipeline,” Short said.

“This is a pipeline that we’re going to be approving, and we’re gonna get the pipelines built.”

Short said the president was not happy with PHMMs review of the NEA’s statement, and that it had not gone far enough.

“The NEA did not have sufficient information about the safety of the pipeline or the environmental impacts, Short said, adding that the NEB’s decision was also not sufficient to protect the environment.